Posted by: porschebahn | January 24, 2009

Gulf Oil LeMans Tribute Carrera Project – Part 2

The 911 was stripped by systems in order for us to catalogue and ziploc each item and its’ mounting bolts,brackets and other associated hardware necessary for its reassembly. Much of what was removed was dead weight in the race car sense and would be shelved for future sale or use . The removed items were weighed so that we could get a close estimate of the final weight of the car after we reassemble it using only necessary systems.

 

The first things removed were the fuel system and the seats and interior floor carpet. The carpeting was disposed of and the seats were stored as we will be using more race practical seats. The tank and lines were drained of old gas and flushed. All interior trim was removed and stored. As the floorpans were inspected and found to be in excellent condition the painstaking job of chipping away the sound deadening mats began and continued on and off during the remaining days. This material is heavy and will muffle the sounds of the engine and gearbox at work.Then both the front and rear bumper assemblies were taken off. These weighed in excess of 70 pounds and will not be reused on the car, rather we will use the lighter and more aerodynamic products available.

 

The next major systems to be removed were the front and rear suspension. These will be cleaned or sandblasted and reinstalled with modifications.

The doors, the front hood and the rear decklid were carefully stored on adjacent shelving. The sunroof and headliner were removed after the front, rear glass and quarter windows were removed. The front windshield is in excellent condition and will be reused, the rear glass will be replaced by lightweight lexan as will the door glass on both sides of the car.

 

Working from the front to rear the wiring harness was loosened and gauges were pulled from the dash face. The entire harness was placed in a plastic bag to protect it from sandblasting and painting. the harness that runs through the center floor-pan tunnel and the engine bay harness were left installed as to remove them would be difficult and likely to result in damage.

The dash pad was removed and all wire harness fastening clips were removed and the area ground smooth. The metal tabs will be replaced with more efficient metal and rubber support clips.

 

Next, the engine and transmission were removed and placed on a dolly in order for us to pressure wash and inspect.

The exposed interior of the car was scraped and wire brushed in order to remove the sound insulation and the adhesive that held it in place.

The front fenders were removed.

A Note of caution here – This disassemble was done in about 60 to 70 man hours by one individual with excellent Porsche experience and the other with basic maintenance skills acting as the assistant. If a relatively inexperienced fellow were to try this procedure on his own it would probably take several hundred man hours to fully disassemble a 911.

  

Next the 911 shell will be placed on a chassis dolly and transported to the sandblasting company.The interior will be completely blasted to bare metal as will the underside, engine bay and the front trunk and nose area. Then a metal etching, two part epoxy primer will be applied immediately. This will take approximately 4 hours and will not include the exterior painted surfaces as these will be carefully sanded down in preparation for body work and painting. The use of high pressure sandblasting on the outer panels could result in heating and warping of the body surface which we want to avoid at all costs. Following this the roll cage will be installed and the car eventually prepared for another coat inside and out of its original Gulf Blue paint.

 

It is now the third week of January 2009 and we have been busy with the car about two weeks. I will update this project again as soon as we have repainted the car hopefully within 6 weeks.

 

To see the start of the project visit Part 1

 


Responses

  1. very nice post, can we echange link


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